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Largs

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Undoubtedly the best know of all of Ayrshire's holiday resorts, in a beautiful setting on the upper reaches of the River Clyde. The town has a strong connection with the Vikings who tried to invade Scotland here. A Viking Festival takes place every August.

Largs is also the ferry point for the Isle of Millport, another very popular holiday resort.

Nearby is Kelburn Country Park, open all the year round and offering walks, gardens, horse riding and much more.

The prominent event connected with the town is the Battle of Largs in 1263. The Norwegians claimed sovereignty over the West Coast of Scotland and the Islands of Scotland resulting in numerous skirmishes between the forces of Alexander III and the Viking King, Haco.

  

Handloom weaving was once the main industry of Largs. Fishing was another important industry with some 50 boats operating in the area.

In 1876, Largs became a police burgh and with the completion of the railway in 1885, the town became in easy reach of Glasgow.

The town has two main celebrations:

Largs has changed considerably over the years - day trippers replace the long term holiday maker of the beginning of the century.

Regrettably Nardini's, a once famous Ice Cream shop in the town has closed.

Largs related web sites
Largs On-line


Lendalfoot

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Littlemill

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Loans

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Loch Doon

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Loch Doon is some 5.5 miles long and about 1.5 miles broad at it's widest part. There is spme wonerful hill walking around the loch BUT for the experienced walker - the area to the south of the Loch is one of the wildest tracts of country in Britain. When walking this area one should be aware of the great exptent of the wildness, the tough terrain and the remotness of the re.

At the south end of the Loch, on the right hand side of the road, near Craigmalloch Farm, stands the remains of Loch Doon Castle. To the left of the castle, when the water level is low, one can see an island which was the original location of the castle. The castle was moved in the early 1930's when the Loch water level was raised as part of a hyrdo-electric scheme. This was not the first instance of Loch Doon be subjected to an engineering project - the history books reveal that Earl of Cassillis and the McAdam of Craigengillian (an estate at the north end of the Loch) drove tunnels underneath the loch to reduce the water level in an attempt to reclaim same land. The exercise proved of little agricultural benefit.

The Castle itself dates back to the late 13th or early 14th century and was built on a small island. In the early 19th century, ancient canoes, battle axes and clubs were found indicating an even earlier settlment on the island. The castle was destroyed sometime during the reign of James V (1513-1542), but prior to that local legend has it that the Castle gave shelter to Robert the Bruce as he was often in the surrounding district.


Loudoun Hill

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If you have had a look at the map on the link above it only gives the approximate location of the actual hill. However one cannot miss this volcanic 'plug' lying to the north side of the Kilmarnock - Strathaven road (A71) just to the east of Darvel

The Hill has since earliest times been a waymark for travellers between the Clyde coast and Edinburgh. A Roman fort was once located at the foot of the Hill and the surrounding area contains many other prehistoric features.


Lugar

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Lugton

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Author : -Bob McIntyre


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