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Ballantrae

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One of the most southern villages in the County, Ballantrae sits on the coast and has a small harbour with stone flagged quay. The harbour used to be a calling point for the Stranraer/Glasgow Steamer. Nowadays it is used only by small fishing and leisure craft.

The original church dates back to the 1600's but a new church was built towards the end of the 19th Century.

The mouth of the River Stinchar, just south of the village, houses a nature reserve, where various types of terns breed.

   
Ballantrae from the south and the Main Street.

Barnweil Monument

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Located on a hill top to the North of Ayr, William Wallace stood at this point due one of his many battles with the English. On this instance he had trapped some of the English Army in Ayr and all the barns in the surrounding area were set on fire, encircling the enemy.

To the north west of the Monument is the remains of what may well be one of the oldest Churches in Ayrshire. It may well be dtaed into the earliest feudal times, ante-dating the Parish system and the Shire. The recenues of the Parish and the running of the Church were the affairs of the Trinitarian Friars of Failford, who were also associated with the Norman Church at Symington. It was probably given to the Friars about 1250. It was shut down in 1673 and has gradually become ruinous. The protection the build gained from the surrounding trees earned it the nickname of "Kirk in the Wood". The site of the Monastry was approcimately 1 mile northwest of the village of Tarbolton where the River Fail crossed the main roadway.


Barr

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A small attractive country village with the Water of Gregg flowing through it. A popular place for an afternoon walk through the various forest roads, or for the more adventurous int0 the hills - but make sure you have a current map of the area. Quite a bit of history in the area, where the covenaters were active.


Barrhill

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A small village near the Ayrshire and Dumfries & Galloway border which is split in two by a narrow road bridge across a river.

   

On driving through the village there is a sign to the Martyr's Tomb, but I have been unable to find any information about this item.
It's railway station located about a mile away above the town, on the Glasgow Stranraer Line. The Station features in Dorothy Sayers detective story The Five Red Herrings.

The village is a meeting place of three roads - from Newton Stewarton, Girvan and New Luce.


Barrmill

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A small community on the Beith Dunlop road, once a cotton-milling and quarrying towanship


Beith

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One of the more northerly towns of the County, it is the home of some old churches, the Auld Kirk dating back to 1593. It has some interesting architectural studies in and around the town.

   

Beith related web sites


Burnhouse

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A small crossroads hamlet on the Beith-Dunlop and Irvine-Barrhead crossroads.


Author : -Bob McIntyre


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